Archives for posts with tag: indonesia

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W140xD80xH150mm, Indonesia

With the nasal mucus dripping down, it mask can only belongs to the clown of the mask dance, the bondres.  The half mask enable them to tell jokes and engaged in comical dialogues.

Bondres Dukuh is the advisor to King Raja, in the dance he also is the means to broadcast the king’s commands.  As a comic Bondres Dukuh is a lame spiritual leader, a bit deaf and blind, his speech are filled with coughs and jokes about betel nut.

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boxW70xD70xH30mm, Indonesia

A small box with the covered made from ikat fabric.

The technique of ikat dyeing starts before the actual weaving begins.  Certain yarn on the warp is wrapped up with thread or string.  When the dye applied to the warp, the wrapped up part form a resist to the dye.  Threads are then removed, leaving an area of undyed yarn.  It is then ready to be woven into cloth.  Because of the unevenness of the warp wrapping, the woven result has a characteristic ikat effect.

Ikat weaving is particularly laborious as the pattern is often pictorial, the warp has to be loaded on the weaving loom before carefully tying up the pattern.  After dying the warp has to be loaded but on the loom at the same location before weaving.

Tungkot Malehat

W35xD40xH130mm, Sumatra, Indonesia

This beautifully carved figurine belongs to the datu (shaman) of the Batak tribe in Sumatra.  It is the finial of a tungkot malehat, a ritual staff used by the datu.  The tungkot malehat consist of the kneeling figure as well as a rattan or bamboo staff (which unfortunately is missing).  Traditionally, these magic staff is carved by the datu himself, they are powerful supernatural weapons for fighting off evils spirits and also has the power of healing.  During the ceremony the datu would enter into a trance while holding the staff which would aid him in the ritual.

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ASIAN FOLKCRAFT

SOIL x MOUNTAIN FOLKCRAFT

Come to see a collection of folkcraft from all over asia; China,  India, Indonesia, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia and Myanmar.

The technique of ikat dyeing starts before the actual weaving begins.  Certain yarn on the warp is wrapped up with thread or string.  When the dye applied to the warp, the wrapped up part form a resist to the dye.  Threads are then removed, leaving an area of undyed yarn.  It is then ready to be woven into cloth.  Because of the unevenness of the warp wrapping, the woven result has a characteristic ikat effect.

Ikat weaving is particularly laborious as the pattern is often pictorial, the warp has to be loaded on the weaving loom before carefully tying up the pattern.  After dying the warp has to be loaded but on the loom at the same location before weaving.

Indonesia ikat are a precious and sacred fabric use in ceremony.

Samples of ikats are shown at the Mountain Folkcraft shop in our Something New Something Old exhibition with Soil.

W200xH600mm, Indonesia

This shadow puppet is Tualen, the father of Merdah, they are both servants of Rama.  Tualen used to be a god but he was punished for a mistake he made and was send down from heaven to be a human with black skin.  Being a god, Tualen is wise and kind.  The Balinese believe that by giving their baby holy water of Tualen, their child will be wise like Tualen.

W250xD100xH180, Indonesia

This Balinese mask is of the character Merdah,  the son of Tualen, both son and father are the servants of Rama.  Merdah lacks the wisdom and apathy of his father but he is eager and honest, a joyful character.  Tualen and Merdah portray the good while Sangut and Delem the evil counterparts.  Merdah is the Penasar clown in the Wayang Wong performance Ramayana, his function is to narrate the stories to the audience.

W70xD60xH270mm, Borneo, Indonesia

This is a hampatong from Borneo, the Dayak tribes create these wooden figurines portraying humans, animals and supernatural creatures.  The hampatongs can be broadly divided into two types; the tajahan (ancestral figures) and pataho (guardian figures for protecting the tribe).  This particular figurine is a tajahan.  Each figures are have their own function and meaning, for the tajahan figures the craftman would capture the details of the particular ancestor.  The animal on which the ancestor is sitting on is most likely to be a goat is believed to be sacred.  This is a protective amulet of a male ancestor sitting on a chair. the bread are made from coconut husk.

L160xW160mm, Indonesia

This is the topeng mask for the character Tembem, a friend of  Penthul.  Tembem and Penthul are characters used in the traditional Javanese dancing depicting warriors practising their fighting skills.  Their are a pair of comics, Penthul with a white face supports the warriors for them to keep a strong spirit.  Tembem, on the other hand, is the sad figure.  On his black face with the white painted tears on his eyes and nose, the crying Tembem represents the supporters who lost the fight.