Archives for posts with tag: asian folkcraft collection

buddha's birthday

W130xD70xH400mm, Thailand

Tomorrow is the 2557th birthday of the Buddha, Vesakh, a holy day that commensurate the birth, enlightenment and death of  Gautama Buddha by Buddhist all over the world.  The date of the celebration differ slightly throughout the different countries, 8th of lunar April, in Thailand for example, Vesakh is on the 24th May. 

On this special day, the devoted Buddhist will observe the 8 Precepts:

  1. I undertake the precept to refrain from destroying living creatures.
  2. I undertake the precept to refrain from taking that which is not given.
  3. I undertake the precept to refrain from sexual activity.
  4. I undertake the precept to refrain from incorrect speech.
  5. I undertake the precept to refrain from intoxicating drinks and drugs which lead to carelessness.
  6. I undertake the precept to refrain from eating at the forbidden time (i.e., after noon).
  7. I undertake the precept to refrain from dancing, singing, music, going to see entertainments, wearing garlands, using perfumes, and beautifying the body with cosmetics.
  8. I undertake the precept to refrain from lying on a high or luxurious sleeping place.

If you happen to be in Hong Kong, join in the celebration.

ASIAN FOLKCRAFT COLLECTION
SOIL X MOUNTAIN FOLKCRAFT

kutani

kutani

DIA90xH90mm, Japan

Kutani Ware (九谷燒) is one of the representative Japanese Iroe (multicolored over the glaze) porcelain produced in Kanazawa, Komatsu, Kaga, and Nomi city in the southern part of Ishikawa prefecture. It’s traced back to 1650’s in the Kutani village.

 There are 3 periods in the Kutani Ware’s history: Ko-Kutani, Saiko Kutani, and Kutani. The ceramics of the three eras are all renowned and highly valued.

 The ceramics produced in the first 50 years are called “Ko-Kutani,” literally meaning old Kutani. They consist of five colors, blue, green, yellow, purple, and red.

This is an item from SOIL for the ASIAN FOLKCRAFT COLLECTION
SOIL X MOUNTAIN FOLKCRAFT

sake gourdDIA70xH130mm, Japan

For the Asian Folkcraft Event, we have from Soil a Sake hyotan container with its own cup!  A more poetic version of the whisky flask.

Hyotan (Gourd) is a symbol of good luck.  This Japanese hyotan gourd is used as handy sake vessel, and complete with a stopper and a ceramic sake cup.  The cup is delicately made, and has a hand painted and gilded decoration depicting a village scene, with a traditional Japanese architecture and pine trees in the background.

Watch this video and find out how gourd could become so useful for wilderness survival.

Here are other gourd items in the shop;
Large Gourd, Small Gourd, Gourd Cricket Cage, Gourd Basket.

paper mache tigerW60xL140xH90mm, Japan

ASIAN FOLKCRAFT COLLECTION

Though tiger is not native to Japan, its worship has started before the first tiger was imported from Korea some 400 years ago.  The figure was generated from painting, tales and imagination, it is believe that the tiger is a symbol of strength and health.  This is a paper mache tiger with a noddy head.

Here is a collection of the paper mache tiger wood block print by Shirayanagi Eiichi (http://www7b.biglobe.ne.jp/~kokakuro/essay/110619shiroyanagi/toratoratora.htm to see the complete description)



tray

W200xL310xH20mm, Myanmar

According to Burmese astrology, there are eight days in a week. They are Sunday, Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday (till noon), Rahu (Wednesday afternoon till the next morning), Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Burmese people believe that the astrological day a person was born is a great determinant in his or her personality and life. For example, a person born on Monday would be jealous; on Tuesday. Honest; on Wednesday, short tempered but soon calm again; the trait being intensified on the so called eighth day of Rahu; on Thursday, mild; on Friday, talkative; on Saturday, hot tempered and quarrelsome; and on Sunday, miserly.

Burmese also believe that interpersonal relation between people is also determined by the day they were born. For example, Monday born and Friday born would not get along well while Monday born and Wednesday or Rahu (Wednesday evening) born would get along very well. At the pagodas in Myanmar, there are always eight planetary posts build into the pagoda structure, with the representative animal symbols, where the believers could donate offerings at their respective planets to influence the appropriate powers.

These astrological symbols are often depicted on traditional Burmese lacquerware. The lacquered tray shown here is decorated with brass wire and the symbols are delicately made by palm skin.

This is one of the many Burmese lacquer ware from the SOIL collection, come check it out at the Asian Folkcraft event on at Mountain Folkcraft!

burmese owl

W45D30H60mm, Mynmar

The Zee Kwet (or) the Myanmar Owls are believed to bring luck and prosperity to a family.  The owls usually comes in pairs, a male owl and a female owl.  But there is something more. At the base of the female owl, a tiny owl is also painted on it, to make it looks like a family.

SOIL X MOUNTAIN FOLKCRAFT
ASIAN FOLKCRAFT COLLECTION

 H250xW150xD50mm, Indonesia

This is one of the topengs which appear in the introductory of the performance, they are archetype of the character in the show.  In the solo act, the dancer will perform pure dance to show off their dancing skill.  This particular mask is that of the Dalem, the handsome king who is intelligent, noble and strong, an ideal ruler.  The actual performance will begin with the entrance of the king’s servants who wear a half mask as the narrator of the show.  The dalem then re-enter and tackle the political or religious problems of his kingdom.

Asian Folkcraft Collection

Burmese Note Book

L200xW130mm, Myanmar

This note book is made entirely by hand in Shan State, eastern sector of  Burma.  About 11 miles from Hsipaw in Shan State South lies Kyinthi Village beside Mandalay-Lashio Union Highway.  Farming and orange is the economic mainstay of the village.  Besides, there is a traditional cottage industry there which is production of Shan paper or Mongkai paper in which every house in the village is engaged for extra income.

Shan paper is made from the bark of tree called “Sar”.  Such trees grow wild naturally.  Shan paper or Mongkai paper is manufactured over one million sheets per month.  Some Shan villages make the paper to be thick enough to use as bed sheets whereas some use it as waterproof wear after coating with lacquer.

Item from Soil for the ASIAN FOLKCRAFT COLLECTION

indonesian puppet

W150xD150xH550mm, Indonesia

Wayang golek is the traditional West Javanese performance of the wooden rod puppet.

Here is a wonderful documentary about the Wayang golek.

The character of this puppet is Abhimanyu, the tragic hero in the Hindu epic Mahabharata.  Son of Arjuna and Subhadra, like his father he was both courageous and a good fighter.  Abhimanyu’s education of becoming a warrior started when he was still in womb of  Subhadra, his father would go through in length different battle formation.  Unfortunately at Subhadra has fallen asleep when it came to the exiting of Chakravyuha and Abhimanyu failed to gain the knowledge and there on the 13th day of the battle he was killed.

Come to see the Asian Folkcraft Collection!

Green lacquerware

DIA200xH150mm, Myanmar

ASIAN FOLKCRAFT COLLECTION
SOIL X MOUNTAIN FOLKCRAFT

It is almost certain that Burma acquired the technique of lacquer production from China where it has a three-thousand year history. However, the use of lacquerware was not confined to royalty and the monkhood in Burma. Lacquer objects were used daily by commoners. Food, refreshments, clothing, cosmetics and flowers are all put in lacquer receptacles.

The importance of lacquer to the Burmese is probably equivalent to the modern uses of porcelain, glass and plastic combined. Indeed, lacquer has many of the characteristics of modern plastic. It is light, waterproof, easily moulded and dries to a hard state.  It can be applied to virtually any surface: plain or carved wood, bamboo, paper, fabric, even metal and stone.

This fruit bowl is made by coiled bamboo, covered by over 20 layers of lacquer and decorated with the Burmese astrological symbols. Process of producing green lacquer ware is rather time consuming: One part indigo was added to ten parts of orpiment to produce a traditional green color. With age, many such green lacquer wares have come to assume appeasing opaque turquoise hue.