Archives for posts with tag: japanese

秀作彫刻展

For those who were mesmerized by lobster wood carving, the artist Ryousuke Ohtake is having an exhibition of his new work in Toyko.

How I wish I am in Tokyo this weekend.

Shu-sake Chokou Ten
30.04.2015 – 06.05.2015
8F Art Gallery @ Tokyo Department Shibuya Flagship Honten

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BORO
The Fabric of Life

The word boro means ‘patched together’ and here refers to the indigo-dyed patched-together garments of the Japanese rural population. Expensive cotton fabrics were reserved to the upper classes. As worn-out rags, they found their way cheaply into the hands of the peasants, who patched them together to create impressive garments of great aesthetic charm.

In their minimalist beauty, these recycled textiles stand not only for artistic creativity and the positive affirmation of the transitory nature of all existence, but also for respect for the natural material and the work of the hands.

The precursors of the boro textiles were the kesa, the garments worn by Buddhist monks, which were also patched together as the outward expression of the Buddhist ideal of poverty. Outstanding monks’ garments from the museum’s own collection have been incorporated into the boro exhibition.

By chance, I got to own a piece of boro, a futonji which became a wall hanging at home.  Would have love to go to see this exhibition.  If you are near Cologne please go to see the exhibition!

28 March to 2 August 2015
Museum für Ostasiatische Kunst Köln

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L180xW100xD20mm, Japan

A neat little gun which loads 3 rounds of elastic shots.

BANG BANG BANG

“I was five and he was six
We rode on horses made of sticks
He wore black and I wore white
He would always win the fight

Bang bang, he shot me down
Bang bang, I hit the ground
Bang bang, that awful sound
Bang bang, my baby shot me down”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADIA50xH180mm, Japan

Happy 2015!

Apart from being the first day of 2015, today is also the Japanese New Year!

Since the Meiji period Japanese new year has changed from the lunar calendar to the Georgian calendar.  Most traditional customs remained the same, mochi, bell ringing and the Daruma doll.

The Daruma is a representation of Bodhidharma, the Buddhist monk who introduced Buddhism to China in the 5th Century, he was also well known for his 9 meditation, gazing onto a wall for 9 years.  The Daruma figurine is red figure on top of the pile, slightly rounded at the bottom like Bodhidharma meditating in the red robe.  Daruma is believed to bring happiness and prosperity and ward off accidents and misfortune and this blessing is renewed every new year.

The aim of the game is to knock off the 5 colour pieces below the Daruma while keep him upright and not falling over.  An upright Daruma at the end of the game would symbolize a success for his meditation and also good luck for the player.

japanese printW160xH220mm, Japan

This Ukiyo-e print two kōshi-jōro (high ranking courtesan) contemplating on a writing a letter.
Would it be a letter to home, a lover or a desirable client?

The movie Sukuran describes life inside Yoshiwara as a courtesan, the rivalry, survival and love.

toy tigerW80xL140xH100mm, Japan

Today is Tango no Sekku, Boy’s day, in Japan.  Along with the Koinobori (carp banner), figurines will be placed inside of the house.  It is believed that these figurines will protect the child; offering bravery and well being.

This is a lucky tiger –  Fuku Tora, made with cloth.

Comparing to the Chinese cloth tiger, it looks more innocent.

japanese printW160xH220mm, Japan

This is an ukiyo-e print depicting a courtesan of  Yoshiwara playing a game of go (published 1910s)

In the Edo period, the Yoshiwara area (now the modern Asakusa of  Tokyo) was the only district of pleasure that was licensed.  Unlike other red light districts in the world, courtesans are trained to be cultured, to be the ideal companion; waka poetry, the game of go, chess, playing cards, calligraphy, ikebana, tea ceremony, incense ceremony and other things.

paper boxW120xD130xH140mm, Japan

  A small paper drawer for storing accessories, the outside of the box is decorated with Japanese paper.  I like the details that is put into the box, the edges of the drawers are covered with a tougher brown paper and metal draw pull just complete the miniature version.

paper box

japanese cabinet

japanese wood block print

W310xH220, Japan

A limited comtempory Japanese wood block print by the artist Masaya, entitled the New Green.

tea bowlDIA90xH70mm, Japan

Handmade pottery tea bowls from Shigaraki, the texture on the exterior is rather rock like.  One almost feel as if one is holding a piece of very fine stone.  The inside of the bowls are glazed to prevent the tea from staining the bowl.

tea bowl