Archives for posts with tag: beads

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DIA200mm, India

 Looking at the beads, the strings of beads, how they are placed.  Sometimes I can see the rhythm of music, would this be the original musical scores?

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DIA200mm, China

The buddhist rosary, Mala, is used for counting the number of times the Mantra is recited.

This is a 108 beads wrist mala, if you count the numbers there are actually 109 beads including the center Guru bead.  The Guru bead symbolizes the Guru from whom one has received the mantra being recited.  The 108 beads represented the 108 earthly desires; the 6 senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, touch, and consciousness) multiplied by 3 reactions (positive, negative, or indifference) making 18 “feelings.” Each of these feelings can be either “attached to pleasure or detached from pleasure” making 36 “passions”, each of which may be manifested in the past, present, or future.

Click to see our other mala.

DIA190mm, China

  This textured cream colour beads are not ivory or bones but musaragalva, made from the giant clams (tridacna gigas).  Clams that can grow to over a meter in width!  Though not a popular material, musaragalva is one of the seven treasures of Buddhism; musaragalva, agate, crystal, amber, pearl and musk.  These seven precious items differs in the ancient scripts but musargalva seems to be always part of the group.  In the Qing dynasty, they are used in the hat knob of the court officials costume, an identification of the ranking.  Musaragalva would have been used for the 6th ranking officials.

Something Old Something New
Collectible Jewellery Collection

DIA165mm, China

All the jewellery featured this week has been string with hand woven strings and put together with the technique from the art of Chinese knotting.  This particular piece is one of the elaborated design with each jade beads carefully placed.  The art of knotting is believe to have started as a function for early form of clothing, then as a memo on a string.  By the Zhou dynasty, 800 B.C., knotting has found its use with jade ornaments.  Since then till the end of Qing dynasty, the art of knotting was a craft practiced by the young girls in China (where 20/20 vision and crafty fingers are minimum requirement).

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DIA160mm, Hong Kong

This neckwear has been sprinkled with a spoonful of jade beads.

Come to see our Something Old Something New Jewellery collection!

W15xH20mm, China

This is the head carving of one of the 18 Arhats (Shi Ba Luo Han).  The 18 Arhats were the original followers of the Buddha who have attained nirvana and are here on earth to protect the Buddhist faith until the arrival of the Maritreya.  These ivory beads are made for the 18 beads mala.

CIR900mm, China

This is the standard 108 beads buddhist rosary, the rosary can be of different numbers of beads 21, 42, 14, 27, 54 with 1080 being the longest. The 108 beads is aimed to defeat the 108 earthly desires;

aggression
ambition
anger
arrogance
blasphemy
calculation
callousness
capriciousness
censoriousness
cruelty
cursing
deceit
derision
discord
egoism
envy
excessiveness
furtiveness
garrulousness
grudgingness
hard-heartedness
haughtiness
high-handedness
ignorance
imposture
impudence
inattentiveness
indifference
insatiability
intolerance
intransigence
lack of comprehension
manipulation
mercilessness
obsession
obstinacy
prejudice
quarrelsomeness
rage
ridicule
sarcasm
stinginess
stubbornness
unkindness
unruliness
unyielding
vanity
violent temper
wrath

(also see entry for buddhist rosary, buddhist prayer beads)

DIA20mm, China

This is an buffalo bone bead for the buddhist rosary, Mala.  The Mala is used for counting the number of times a mantra has been recited.  Bone beads (because of its material departing from the idea of Chinese Buddhism) is not commonly used for the Chinese buddhist rosary.  In Tibetan Buddhism, however, the use the nature bones and horns are a reminder of the impermanence of our bodies and that we are, like everything else just a passing phenomenon.

W390xL70xH20mm, Japan

This is a Soroban.  A calculation device.  The Japanese version of the abacus.  The number of rods are always of odd number, starting from 13, then 21, 23, 27 (this one) and going up all the way to 31.  The more rods will allow for more digits in the calculation.  The beads on the rods are separated in 2 rows by the reckoning bar; on each rod below the bar are 4 earth beads, above it there is 1 heaven bead.  Each rod represent the same digit, with 1 heaven bead = 5 earth beads, so each rod can go up to 9 before moving to the next digit.  The Soroban is still currently in use in Japan, it is reinforced by being taught at school and as part of the entrance requirement to public cooperation.