Archives for posts with tag: tray

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Small – L290xW170xH180mm
Medium – L350xW200xH260mm,
Large – 420xW260xH300, China

A bamboo basket constructed by large bamboo strips rather then the weaving method.
This gives the basket a much bolder and simplistic style.

Amongst the unique pottery, you will also find Mountain Folkcraft’s collection at the Cobo Ceramic Workshop X’mas Sale.

COBO CERAMIC WORKSHOP
1/F Fortune Court, 33 Morrison Hill Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong

5 – 9 Dec 2014 (Fri – Tue)
13:00-20:00


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DIA330xH70mm, China

A lacquer tray of a lion playing with a xiu qiu (a fabric ball), a symbol of blessing from this mythical powerful creature.

The tray is constructed by 8 sections and a flat octagonal size board in the center, held with a wire.  The base of the 8 sections have fine carving painted in gold.

Click here to see our other lacquer trays.

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lacquer tray

DIA115xH65mm, Thailand

This curious circular lacquer tray has been a puzzle for me, I cannot figure out what was the original usage for such item.  The material of the tray is very delicate, made with paper and a semi transparent lacquer.

If anyone know of the origin and usage of this tray, please let me know!
Other unsolved mystery.

This is going to be my next Something Old Something New project, stay tune!
Previous items: Coconut Lid Containers, Lotus Leaf Vessel.

tray

W200xL310xH20mm, Myanmar

According to Burmese astrology, there are eight days in a week. They are Sunday, Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday (till noon), Rahu (Wednesday afternoon till the next morning), Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Burmese people believe that the astrological day a person was born is a great determinant in his or her personality and life. For example, a person born on Monday would be jealous; on Tuesday. Honest; on Wednesday, short tempered but soon calm again; the trait being intensified on the so called eighth day of Rahu; on Thursday, mild; on Friday, talkative; on Saturday, hot tempered and quarrelsome; and on Sunday, miserly.

Burmese also believe that interpersonal relation between people is also determined by the day they were born. For example, Monday born and Friday born would not get along well while Monday born and Wednesday or Rahu (Wednesday evening) born would get along very well. At the pagodas in Myanmar, there are always eight planetary posts build into the pagoda structure, with the representative animal symbols, where the believers could donate offerings at their respective planets to influence the appropriate powers.

These astrological symbols are often depicted on traditional Burmese lacquerware. The lacquered tray shown here is decorated with brass wire and the symbols are delicately made by palm skin.

This is one of the many Burmese lacquer ware from the SOIL collection, come check it out at the Asian Folkcraft event on at Mountain Folkcraft!

DIA330mm, China

For those of us who grew up going to Japanese restaurants in Hong Kong, eating out of the black / red shiny bento boxes is a norm, so much that it becomes a symbol in our mind.  But anyone ever wonder why there are so many black plastic containers?  They are actually a replica of the lacquer ware that would have been traditionally used.  Those are probably the closest some of us get to know of lacquer ware.

The making of lacquer ware is a laborious task of collecting urushiol from the lacquer tree (Toxicodendron vernicifluum) and applying thin layers of lacquer over a form (in this case, wood), let dry, polish and apply again and again.  Here is a clip of Japanese lacquer tray making;

You will be surprised that the price of this handmade lacquer tray is not any more expensive than a good quality plastic one, and if you handle it with care (avoid soaking in water and the use of abrasive cleaner) it will last just as long.  Make this your first lacquer ware!

This item selected by Furze for the Something Old Something New exhibition and is available at both Mountain Folkcraft and Soil.

DIA360xH110, China

Bamboo basket (tray like) used to be a common household item; in the days when refrigerator is not so common, the weaving of the bamboo strips avoid trap moisture and made the vegetable and fruit stored last longer.  Apart from the everyday use, the bamboo tray basket also feature on the wedding day, when the bride leaves her parents home a respected female of the family will use the bamboo basket to shield the bride from the sun.