Archives for posts with tag: bell

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADIA220mm, Hong Kong

A necklace of layering, of intertwining.
Like exotic fruits on a ivy.

Handmade and unique.

Something Old Something New
Collectible Jewellery Collection

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bellW300xD140xH350mm, Thailand

There is a long history for domesticated elephant in Thailand; with the strength the elephants can offer, they are captured from the wild and trained (a bit like the domestication of horses and dogs).  The white elephants were offered to the King and worshiped, some were trained to be fighting elephants, as the one used by Queen Suriyothai’s carrier in the war with the Burmese in 1548AD.  Others were trained to be laborers for the forestry, pulling logs from the mountain down to the river.  To track the elephants, bells were put around their neck so they can be heard in the forest.

Here is a Thai folk tale about a boy and an elephant bell.

Once upon at time, there is a poor boy despite of his lack of education he was taught the virtue of respect.  One day the boy was lost in the forest,  he wandered fearfully and came face to came with a full grown elephant.  The huge elephant was strolling peacefully munching banana and other fruits.  Judging by the size of the elephant, the boy thought the elephant must be thousands of years old and must be respected, he kneeled and bowed giving his respect to the animal.  Touched by the act the elephant helped him to find his way home, then the elephant said to the little boy, “Here is a bell given to me by the King of the Elephants, ring it if you are in trouble and the other elephants will come to help you.”  Then one day, the boy and his father were in the forests collecting wood for the fire.  Lighting strike and they became stuck by a fallen tree.  The boy remembered the elephant’s word and rang the bell, soon a herd of elephants came and lift the fallen tree and relieved them.  At the same time, the wild elephant who gave him the bell was captured and being trained as a fighting elephant.  Unsuited to his general temperment, the elephant snapped, killed his mahout trainer and destroyed the village.  The news reached the King and the troops were sent to kill the elephant, when the boy heard the news he volunteer to go to tamed the elephant in exchange for him to be free.  As he entered the village, the elephant charged for an attack.  The boy generally kneel and bowed as he did before, as he rang the bell, the elephant remembered him and came close to him.  The elephant calmed down and followed him to meet with the King who kept his word and the elephant was free.

What we need today is respect for these animals.

Three beautiful films by Gregory Colbert.



DIA165mm, China

This beautiful blue beads are jade beads dyed with a technique which dated back to the Han dynasty.  Unlike today where a lot of  jade are dyed to imitate the perfect shade of green in order to fetch a better price, in the previous dynasties jade are dyed simply for a desired colour.  The material is treated almost the same as a piece of cloth.

According to the book Yu Ji (The Record of Jade) of the Qing dynasty jade can be divided into 9 Se and 13 Cai.
“Se” refers to the intrinsic colour of the jade;  still ocean black, indigo blue, moss green, peacock feather green, steam chestnut yellow, cinnabar red, clot blood purple, ink black, white as snow to lard.

The 13 “Cai” refers to the dye colour;
chestnut yellow from using earth with a darker shade when using rosin,
sky to sapphire blue from indigo,
peach red from lime,
coal black from mercury,
date red from blood,
parrot green from copper,
other dye colours include cinnabar red, chicken blood read, palm fiber purple, aubergine purple, pine cone green, ginkgo green, okra yellow, wine yellow, fish belly white, brown rice white, shrimp roe green, snot green.

Apart from the colour, the book also describe patterns, textures and even fragrant can be achieved.

blue bells

happy encounter necklace

DIA195mm, China

Now for something old, this is an original long life locket necklace.

There are a lot of symbolism on this necklace.

First, Survival –  the Locket – Long Life Locket, a lock with would secure one’s life to this work.  This have been also featured in the following blogs; Original Long Life Locket, 13 Tai Bao Locket, Kirin Boy Necklace, Locket, Silver Necklace, A Fu, Du Dou.  On this particular locket, it has written the blessing of longevity and prosperity.

Then, Happiness is a spirit that all humanity long for, the Chinese too uses a lot of symbols for it.  The two children hanging on either side of the necklace is call “Happy Encounters”,  two of them meeting up, enjoying the company of each other.  They can also be found in another one of our Original Long Life Locket.

Third, Protector – the two rounded capsules which are in fact bells in the form of a tiger head, a symbol of protection for the child.  Tiger, an animal of power has always been worshiped, the Chinese would entrust their children to be under their protection.  Other toys and children’s clothing also shared the same effect; Tiger Headband, Tiger Du Dou, Tiger Shoes, Tiger Squeak, Cloth Tiger Toy.  The bell would add another layer of that protection of the power to chase the devil away, see Bell Necklace.